Philipp Poisel is back in his element: with the new album "Neon" the German songwriter gets to the bottom of the essence of his songs and reveals a whole new side of his creativity. He himself describes his fourth studio album as the key to typical Poiselian poetics. As of 2008 "Where does your heaven begin?" turned the German songwriting scene on its head, it was this very distinctive style that made Poisel stand out from the crowd: a charming mumble, the voice always on the verge of breaking, timid and filigree and yet courageous to open up completely. In addition, thanks to his lyrics, Philipp Poisel has become the musician we celebrate.

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“Neon” takes the many word games, comparisons and images one level further. While metaphors are the usual stylistic devices of German poets, Poisel often finds an almost bizarre image and gets lost in detailed scenes of emotions. Something with longing, something with melancholy, no matter how happy the melody is. “Neon” brings everything that was there before in individual songs together and shows the peculiarity that has always been suggested. There are the lively numbers like “Everything about you shines” or “Gasoline”. On the other hand, there are rustic acoustic songs like “Alt und Grau”, which are reminiscent of the water lily pond project.

That Philipp Poisel creates an even stronger feeling of honesty and intimacy on this album should surprise many. But in fact the musician seems to look even deeper than he already does. It should be just as astonishing that even this wonderfully dreamy romantic of the German pop landscape couldn't help becoming political. Because in “What remains of us” the beautiful love affair turns into an image for the climate crisis.

“What remains of us” as a statement for climate policy

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After Poisel on "My America" Tried out some newer styles and manifested his longing in this place, “Neon” is a way back into his cerebral world, which we get to know a little better on eleven tracks. Pop love encounters vintage crackling, black and white pictures, montages and collages - a real Poisel album.